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London Underground Signs From Past To Present

London Underground signs from past to present Baker Street was one of the original stops on London’s Underground system. The station opened in 1863.

It incorporates the world’s first underground railway, which opened in 1863 and now forms part of the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, as well as the first line to operate underground electric trains, in 1890, now part of the Northern line. 

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The network has expanded to consist of 11 lines and in 2011/12 it carried over 1 billion passengers.

The idea of an underground railway linking the City of London with the railway termini in its urban centre was proposed in the 1830s. The world’s first underground railway, it opened in January 1863 between Paddington and Farringdon using gas-lit wooden carriages hauled by steam locomotives.

The word “UNDERGROUND” was placed in a roundel instead of a station name on posters in 1912 by Charles Sharland and Alfred France, as well as on undated and possibly earlier posters from the same period.

Frank pick s solid red disc cumbersome and took a version where the disc became a ring from a 1915 Sharland poster and give it to Edward Johnston to develop, and registered the symbol as a trademark in 1917.

The roundel was first printed on a map cover using the Johnston typeface in June 1919, and printed in colour the following October.

London Underground Signs From Past To Present

London Underground Signs From Past To Present

London Underground Signs From Past To Present

ovent garden

Earl´s Court

piccadilly-circus

Tottenham Court Road

Regents street

charing cross

Holborn

Hammersmith

knightsbridge

oxford circus

cockfosters

st-pauls

aldgate

kennington

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